How big is Your Slavery Footprint?

Well that sure brightened up my Saturday morning. In my defense of the indefensible, I know where much of that comes from: piles of t-shirts, sweatshirts and backpacks. The vast majority of which I didn’t buy. Gadget geeks, of which I am not one, may as well get out on their window ledges and prepare to jump.

You can find your slavery footprint, too. Come on, go ahead.

The methodology is here, which includes the following explanation of their definition of slavery, or forced labor:

Anyone who is forced to work without pay, being economically exploited, and is unable to walk away. Note: Forced Labor, also known as involuntary servitude, may result when unscrupulous employers exploit workers made more vulnerable by high rates of unemployment, poverty, crime, discrimination, corruption, political conflict, or cultural acceptance of the practice. Immigrants are particularly vulnerable, but individuals also may be forced into labor in their own countries. Female victims of forced or bonded labor, especially women and girls in domestic servitude, are often sexually exploited as well.

After investigating the slavery usage in individual product components, based on the most common places in which they are mined, grown or made, we assigned scores to each of these 400+ products. These scores were based on a complex algorithm that determines the minimum number of slaves (forced laborers) used to produce each product.

Individual brands or manufacturers aren’t listed either, but you get the general idea.

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