Notebooks from a trampfest. Travel tips, tales and images, online since 2006.

Chaiten Volcano, Five Years Later, Revisited

Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013

I posted a few photos from Chaitén a couple days ago, a quick survey of some of the damage still visible in this southern Chilean town nearly five years after the massive eruption of a volcano that bears the town’s name. Below is a heftier gallery and a short bit of video from further walks around town.

Note: Last updated on 15-Feb-2016.

My brisk explorations can be likened to dusting off a newspaper morgue’s clip file from a five-year sleep. For perhaps a week back in mid-May 2008 –certainly no more than two—the eruption received daily play in international news broadcasts, often in the context of inconvenienced travelers who were grounded in South American airports because of the 16-mile high ash cloud the volcano produced. Over the next few months, a follow up would appear here and there before the story quickly faded, forgotten like countless others. The nature of the news cycle. The story only continues in Chaitén; that’s the story that interests me.

A bit of background –

In May 2008 the Chaitén Volcano, located about 1,200 kilometers south of Santiago, woke from a 9,370-year slumber. It’s primary eruption lasted about a month; at its peak activity it blew a column of ash and gas nearly 31 kilometers into the sky and spewed ash as far as Buenos Aires, 2,000 kilometers away.

Half of the town of Chaitén, which sits 10 kilometers to the southwest, was destroyed. Most of the damage came after the main eruption when the Blanco River, swollen with rain and volcanic material, flooded its banks. The river has since been rerouted and five years later, considerable damage remains, rendering parts of Chaitén a seaside ghost town.

Notebook –

A heavy fog blanketed Chaiten the morning after I arrived, so I had little idea what the town and its surroundings looked like.

To the west, directly in front of my hotel’s doors, the wall of fog made it impossible to gauge how far from the road, presumably a seaside road, the Gulf of Corcovado actually was. When the mist started to lift over the Gulf, first to appear was a set of ten relatively new exercise machines, forlornly staring at the invisible seas. Next, a gloomy lunar landscape began to emerge; large gray sandbars at first, then the debris they were littered with: dead trees, branches and brush of various shapes and sizes and portions of homes washed away by the raging river.

When the fog dissipated, the edge of the Gulf finally appeared, about a half mile into the distance. Between the road and the coastline sat thousands of tons of ash and mud that the flooded river dumped into the gulf.

Still smoking. Chaiten Volcano at right. 04-Mar-2013
Still smoking. Chaiten Volcano at right. 04-Mar-2013

Chaitén sits in a pretty setting, tucked between mountains on all sides but to the west where the gulf forms its boundary. To the south, visible from almost anywhere in town, the stepped and pointed 2,300m (7,546 ft) peak of the Corcovado Volcano looms large. The Chaitén Volcano, pictured above, is just to the northeast and still smokes.

In the early days of the eruptions, residents were forced to evacuate; most were transported to temporary shelters in the town of Castro on Chiloe Island or to Puerto Montt, the nearest larger city to the north. Most never returned. Prior to the eruption, just shy of 5,000 people lived in Chaitén; now about 1,300 call the town home.

Javier, the owner of the popular El Quijote Restaurant and rooming house, was one of the last to leave, and among the evacuees who was most eager to return. He hints at a general mistrust of the government at the time, and even shared one ludicrous conspiracy theory that some (not him, he insisted) believed: that in the wake of the eruption, the government was intentionally trying to let the town die –“kill the town” were his words— so they could sell the land to U.S. conservationist Douglas Tompkins, who owns Parque Pumalín, a vast 317,000-hectare, or 800,000-acre, private reserve just north of Chaitén.

Tompkins, the founder of The North Face and Esprit, has long been a divisive force in Chile. Together with his wife Kris, a former CEO of Patagonia, both ardent conservationists, the couple owns more than two million acres in Argentina and Chile, more than any other individuals in the world. They have already donated two areas to the state that have become national parks, and eventually Pumalin will become a park as well. Criticism and mistrust of Tompkins has subsided since his buying spree began in the early 1990s, but his name continues to come up when passions about land are enflamed.

There is still a lack of some basic services. Residents to the south of the rerouted river have power between 7am and 11pm but have to do without at night. “No Facebook past midnight!” Javier says, smiling.

Based on walks to most areas, I’d estimate that between one-fifth to one-fourth of the buildings are not inhabitable. Many of the destroyed and damaged homes were purchased by the government, but should former residents decide to move back, Javier says, they’ll have to pay substantially more for the properties that have sat neglected for nearly five years.

Endnotes

Chaitén is a great jumping off point, or base, for Parque Pumalin. Check out Chaitur, operated by kind, friendly and well-read English-speaking Nicholas who organizes tours to the various areas in park, the Yelcho glacier, and to the Chaitén crChaiten 22ater. His office is also a main bus stop; check there for both north- and south-bound routes.

Food? Javier cooks up some excellent fish dishes and serves up delicious and generous sized steaks. His restaurant El Quijote is on O’Higgins, across the street from Chaitur, a block from the coastal road. Or just come for a local microbrew and enjoy the relatively fast and free wi-fi.

Accommodations? The bed bug bites emerged midway through Tuesday’s day-long journey to Puerto Montt and are driving me mildly insane today, so the following warning is in order: If you choose to stay at the Hotel Schilling and are put in room No 5, avoid the bed on the left. Consider yourself warned.

Finally, here’s a brief video I put together…

.. and 15 more photos.

Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 04-Mar-2013
Chaiten microbrew.
Chaiten microbrew.
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013
Chaiten Volcano eruption, five years on. 03-Mar-2013

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  1. Playamart - Zeebra Designs says

    wow; that’s one sobering scene. one could easily project him/herself into a creative glimpse into the future when some horrific catastrophe had destroyed our planet.. and a survivor walks the barren ghost towns.

    i would think that a strong vibe would pulse from the landscape, like an organism in a coma.

  2. […] At the moment, the project is awaiting government approval to build nearly 2,000 kilometers (1,300 miles) of high voltage transmission lines that would relay the power from the south to the nation’s central grid in the north. Some of the proposed route traverses a seismically active region dotted with volcanoes. The most recent major eruption was in Chaiten in 2008. […]

  3. […] firewood delivery in the village of Puyuhuapi; a house in Chaitén still buried in ash and mud five years after the massive Chaitén Volcano eruption; Chilean Holly, or taique, in the wild in Queulat National Park; and a llama eating with his mouth […]

  4. […] I posted twice before from and about Chaiten; there are a few more photos in a quick post here and a much longer notebook entry, with several photos and some short video clips here. […]

  5. […] first with a calving at the Perito Moreno Glacier in Argentina and then with the aftermath of the Chaiten Volcano eruption in […]

  6. […] I posted twice before from and about Chaiten; there are a few more photos in a quick post here and a much longer notebook entry, with several photos and some short video clips here. […]

  7. Marilyn Jones says

    So very sad. You did an excellent job of capturing the devastation with your photographs.

    1. Bob R says

      Thanks, Marilyn.

  8. Gabor Kovacs says

    It is impressive to see that after 5 years, the destruction is still so visible and so many buildings are still inhabitable. When we traveled around South America in 2012, sometimes we asked people if they visited Chaitén and most of them never even heard about it, they thought that we were asking about El Chaltén. It seems to be one of this long forgotten natural disasters…

    1. Bob R says

      I headed north along much of Chile’s Carretera Austral, and Chaiten is one of the last larger cities/settlements on the route before it ends in Puerto Montt. Some of the infrastructure is coming back, but the pace is incredibly slow.

  9. Raphael Alexander Zoren says

    I totally love active volcanoes, we have a lot of them here in Mexico! It is quite symbolic that I watched the movie Pompeii the same day that I was staying at Puebla, a city located right next to the Popocatepetl, Mexico’s fiercest volcano! 😀

    1. Bob R says

      I have yet to climb one to the top. Was close once in Nicaragua. 🙂

  10. Tara Gorman says

    Wow! Love how you describe the scene and then there are the photos to match – but your words really brought this experience to life. I’ll bet it was amazing to see! And thanks for the tips on food and accommodation, definitely good to know!

    1. Bob R says

      Thanks, Tara. 🙂

  11. Erin says

    INCREDIBLE! Mother Nature’s power is just stunning. I’ve shared your video on Twitter. It’s poignant and needs to be seen. Wonderful work here, Bob.

    1. Bob R says

      Thanks Erin, you rock! I really appreciate that.

  12. Angela Travels says

    It is always interesting how different places change over the years. Great post!

  13. Samantha @mytanfeet says

    Wow 5 years later and it is all still there… it’s sad to see the houses all abandoned and in bad shape but the volcano sure is a powerful tool of nature. Great pics!

  14. Anonymous says

    Hey article as per usual Bob!
    I am stunned that there is still so much damage 5 years on, it really shows what “mother nature” can do.
    It is sad that there isnt much support form the Government to rebuild.
    I have always been very fascinated with volcanoes and I guess general natural disasters, they are so beautiful yet so much destruction flows and so many lives are ruined. Such a pity.

  15. Sam @Travelling King says

    (sorry forgot to write my dets)
    Hey article as per usual Bob!
    I am stunned that there is still so much damage 5 years on, it really shows what “mother nature” can do.
    It is sad that there isnt much support form the Government to rebuild.
    I have always been very fascinated with volcanoes and I guess general natural disasters, they are so beautiful yet so much destruction flows and so many lives are ruined. Such a pity

  16. Marysia @ My Travel Affairs says

    I have been in Chile few years ago and somehow I have missed this place. Noted for my next visit! 🙂

  17. anna parker says

    incredible to think it still looks like that 5 years on, stunning photography

  18. […] was destroyed by a volcanic eruption in 2008. This is how I described that morning scene in this notebook entry posted from the ruined town last […]

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