Notebooks from a trampfest. Travel tips, tales and images, online since 2006.

Doha’s Museum of Islamic Art – Exhibit Notebook

War Mask, Eastern Turkey or Western Iran, 15th century. Steel with gold inlay

I posted previously about the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar, the finest museum in the Emirate and one that houses one of the most complete collections of Islamic art in the world.

Then, I focused on the stunning architecture of the building itself, which was designed by I. M. Pei. This time the focus is on those parts of the collection that I chose to photograph specifically to publish here primarily as a reference for myself –and of course, for anyone else who might find it useful. Above is a 15th century steel war mask with a gold inlay from either Eastern Turkey or Western Iran. I’ll never tire of looking that mask.

I’ve divided the 31 photos into two sections: Arabic Script, Calligraphy and the Qur’an, and Ceramics, Paintings, Instruments and Tools. So much of Islamic history and culture is based on Arabic script, itself a work of art, making it a strong focal point of the museum’s collection. The second grouping –i.e. everything else– impressed me for its breadth. The variety is quite astounding.

Each photo is labeled exactly as it was in the museum. Click on the image to see a larger version with its description. More info available in the collections section of the museum’s website.

These were all taken with my Samsung Galaxy 3 under natural light –flash is not allowed– so some of the quality will leave a bit to be desired. My apologies. But the gist is there, as is the beauty of the objects.

Arabic Script, Calligraphy and the Qur’an

 

Ceramics, Paintings, Instruments and Tools

All photos taken in May 2014.

Location: on the Corniche next to the Dhow Harbor (you really can’t miss it)
Hours of Operation:
Sunday 10:30am to 5:30pm
Monday 10:30am to 5:30pm
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 10:30am to 5:30pm
Thursday 12pm to 8pm
Friday 2pm to 8pm
Saturday 12pm to 8pm

Admission is free, as is the wifi. More on the museum website.

 

[Previous Doha and Qatar-related posts] [More Galleries] [More Museum-related posts]

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2 Comments
  1. Alli Farkas says

    A little puzzled by the occasional figurative piece. Thought images of living beings were forbidden in Islamic art, but found a wonderful explanation here http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/figs/hd_figs.htm if anyone else should be curious.

    1. Bob R says

      Thanks for that link, indeed very useful. I haven’t looked but I’m sure there’s mention of it in the museum’s website as well since the distinction between religious and secular work was mentioned in one of the intro texts in the museum.

Thoughts?

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