Pic du Jour – On the Street, Piran

Kogoj Street, Piran

I made a quick visit today to Piran, Slovenia’s 1000-year-old seaside town, to say a brief goodbye. I’m leaving Slovenia tomorrow for the US and points well south for at least the next 12 months, and couldn’t part without a quick jaunt to the Adriatic coast, more specifically to Piran, which gave this blog its name and me to the world. 🙂

This was snapped on Kogoj street, deep inside the city’s network of narrow cobblestone streets. Some of the buildings in the town date back to the first half of the 15th century. Check out this post from 2012 that includes more on the town and my history with it –along with a couple dozen images.

Since returning from Morocco 13 days ago, the vast majority of my time has been occupied with organizing, packing and storing –and even minimizing the stuff that I’ve convinced myself belongs in my stash of worldly belongings. I’m happy to report that the latter’s becoming easier. For more on the latter, I strongly suggest you check out The Minimalists, and excellent website authored by Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus who write about living a meaningful life with less stuff. Check it out.

For the record, today’s Pic du Jour, the 266th straight, was snapped on 05-Oct-2014. Please click on the image to see the full uncropped version.

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  1. Alli Farkas says

    Visited the post you linked and sucked in the photos. There’s something about places that are very, very, very (did I say “very” enough times?) old that just make me, and I suppose others, feel somehow removed from modern day hubbub and delicately connected to ancient humanity. Redolent is the word that comes to mind when I visit intact ancient places. Redolent of so many things–life, death, creativity, craftsmanship, the sense that something built by man could endure the ravages of earthly time for so many centuries. I can appreciate why you are reluctant to leave, although I understand how the adventurous nature of youth could have propelled you to leave in the first place. Subsequent leavings are a bit more problematical!

    1. Bob R says

      I think you should have squeezed in one more ‘very’. 🙂 Indeed, each leaving is more difficult, for plenty of reasons, some obvious and some less so. I was born in Piran but left when I was just six months old. I spent a year of my adult life here nearly a decade ago, but it didn’t quite live up to the lofty expectations I had set. I still very much enjoy returning, even if just once a year for a few hours.

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