Bald Eagle | Stock Image Gallery

Bald Eagle 09

For those of you from the U.S., where it’s difficult to escape from the symbol of your national bird and animal, the bald eagle needs little introduction. Majestic and exuding serene confidence, it’s among the most beautiful members of the eagle family.

Found in most of Canada, Alaska, the lower 48 states and northern Mexico, Haliaeetus leucocephalus is usually seen near large bodies of water and nests in old-growth trees. Among North American birds, its dwellings are the largest; Wikipedia reports that one was measured at 2.5m (8.2ft) wide, 4m (13ft) deep, weighing one metric ton while National Geographic mentions a next that tipped the scales at more than two tons. They tend to mate for life so I guess a larger more permanent dwelling makes sense.

They’re not really bald; that name comes from the white plumage on its head, which is identical in males in females. The latter is usually 25 percent larger.

It’s body size ranges from 86 to 109cm (34 to 43in); wingspan, 1.8 to 2.4m 6 to8ft), and 3 to 6.5kg (6.5 to 14lbs) in weight.

On the brink of extinction in the continental U.S., it’s made a strong comeback, thanks largely to restrictions on DDT use. From National Geographic:

For many decades, bald eagles were hunted for sport and for the “protection” of fishing grounds. Pesticides like DDT also wreaked havoc on eagles and other birds. These chemicals collect in fish, which make up most of the eagle’s diet. They weaken the bird’s eggshells and severely limited their ability to reproduce. Since DDT use was heavily restricted in 1972, eagle numbers have rebounded significantly and have been aided by reintroduction programs. The result is a wildlife success story—the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has upgraded the birds from endangered to threatened.

Impact of Climate change? Audubon projects:

[.. the bald eagle] is projected to have only 26 percent of its current summer range remaining by 2080, according to Audubon’s climate model. However, it could potentially recover 73 percent of summer range in new areas opened up by a shifting climate. Its success isn’t guaranteed in the new areas—the majestic raptor will still have to find suitable food and nesting habitat.

More info:

These initial images were taken at the Parque Cóndor, a rescue and release bird park and sanctuary near Otavalo, Ecuador.

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All images © Bob Ramsak 2015. All rights reserved. High resolution images available.
For stock or editorial use please get in touch.
For print purchases please visit here; for greeting cards and post cards here.
If you’d like a print or card of an image not yet listed in those portfolios, let me know. I’ll be happy to make it available.
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Bald Eagle 01
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Bald Eagle 03
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Bald Eagle 05
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Bald Eagle 08
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Bald Eagle 07
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Bald Eagle 10
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Bald Eagle 06
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Bald Eagle 02
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[divider type="white"]
All images © Bob Ramsak 2015. All rights reserved. High resolution images available.
For stock or editorial use please get in touch.
For print purchases please visit here; for greeting cards and post cards here.
If you’d like a print or card of an image not yet listed in those portfolios, let me know. I’ll be happy to make it available.
Note: Galleries will be updated regularly (as needed).
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  1. Emilie Vardaman says

    Beautiful images! I have seen only a few in my life, most in Glacier Park. With climate change, many of us, not just the eagle, will lose our habitats. Antarctica recorded record highs a few days in a row and sadly also recorded record ice melts.
    Shorelines are disappearing. Where I live (southern Arizona) we have had a mild winter, an unusually early spring, and enough winter rain to cause the grasses to grow. This sounds great, but when fire season comes, those grasses will burn fast and hot,

    1. Bob R says

      Thanks, glad you like them. They really are majestic birds.

      As for losing habitats – it’s a bit ironic that among the first to lose theirs will be those in places like coastal Florida, whose elected officials choose to live and preach climate change denial.

  2. jozdatelover says

    Sorry, I forgot to sign in again, before commenting.

    Not only have wolves been eradicated by ranchers for meat consumption. So, have cougars, fixes, bears, ravens, and eagles (including bald eagles); among countless other wildlife. Ironic, isn’t it. Yet, another reason to go vegan: patriotic.

    1. jozdatelover says

      In addition to all the land that is eradicated of all wildlife for the factory farms just for meat, fish, and dairy consumption.

  3. ladieswholunchreviews says

    love the pictures, Bob. Happy 4th!

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